The Bail Process Explained

If you know someone who has been arrested, you might be looking to bail them out of jail. But the process can be intimidating for those who are unfamiliar with it. Do you actually have to pay to free them? Will you ever get your money back? Here’s a helpful rundown of the methods by which you can post bail.

Bail Bonds

Bail bonds are provided by an insurance company through an agent known as a bail bondsman. They secure the release of the defendant pending trial. The first thing to know about how to bail someone out of jail philadelphia pa is that there’s usually a charge of 10 percent of the amount of the bond. The defendant must also put up collateral such as a mortgage on a house. When the court case ends (regardless of verdict), the bail bond is “exonerated” and returned to the insurance company. The only way a full bail would have to be paid is if the person who has been bailed out disappears and never shows up in court (aka “jumps bail”).

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Property Bonds

If you lack the resources for a bail bondsman, pledging property as collateral may be an option. State laws vary, but in most cases the value of the property must be double the bond. However, because property bonds must include an application, a promissory note, a current appraisal and other documents, the process of having one posted can be lengthy. As with any bond, if the defendant fails to appear, the property will be considered forfeited.

Cash Bail

If you do have enough funds to pay a bail amount, you can simply bring it to the jail to secure the defendant’s release. Cash bail is fully refundable to the person who posts it, less administrative fees, at the end of the court case. However, it can often take a few months for the money to be returned.

Few things are more unsettling than seeing someone you know make a mistake that lands them in jail. Bailing them out is often the first step in setting that person on the right path.

3 Main Differences in Chapter 7 and 13 Bankruptcy

Finding yourself suffocated in a mountain of debt is never easy. Admitting that the problem lies in your poor spending habits can take years, and by then, you may only be faced with a few choices.

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One of those ways out may be filing bankruptcy. A chapter 7 lawyer orlando fl is one person who may be able to help you shed some of the weight that pulls you down. Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy filings are the two most popular means for individuals and couples to get a resolution to the suffocating problem. Find out three of the key differences between the two, so you can decide if one will work better for you.

1. Chapter 7 Liquidates Some Assets 

When you think of bankruptcy, you probably envision someone telling you what you can and can’t keep. Chapter 7 filing, is as close to this vision as any other route. A trustee is appointed who will help you put your debts in order from secured to unsecured. The trustee will also review all of your assets and suggest the things that should be liquidated or given back to the lienholder in the case of secured debt. Some states allow you to keep your home and a vehicle under Chapter 7.

2. Chapter 13 Creates a Payment Plan

Chapter 13 may work for those who have enough income to pay off some of their debt in installments. Again the trustee puts obligations in order and then helps negotiate a reasonable sum for each. All of the debts are added and split into monthly payments which last from three to five years. Once the payment plan is fulfilled, the remaining debt is discharged from the credit.

3. Chapter 7 Stays on Your Credit Longer

Chapter 7 bankruptcy may be helpful to take care of sizeable debt; however, since you are not paying everything off, it can linger on your credit longer. A typical Chapter 7 remains ten years after discharge. Chapter 13 is usually gone after seven years.

Speaking with someone about your options is the best way to go when facing an uncertain future.

3 Tips for Finding the Best Immigration Lawyer

It is important to obtain full United States citizenship or resolve any immigration matters soon, as it may become more difficult to accomplish these tasks in the future. These matters involve complex laws, which makes the entire process stressful and time-consuming. A law firm dedicated to immigration and citizenship can assist you throughout each step, answering questions and ensuring everything goes smoothly. Consider the following tips as you look for the right immigration lawyer. 

Research Each Candidate

Since US immigration is a delicate topic and citizenship is a complex process, you will need professional, knowledgeable assistance to guarantee a successful first time. Research each law firm and lawyer and look for multiple factors that can confirm their effectiveness, such as how long they have been established, as well as references and reviews by clients. Make sure they are qualified by investigating their licenses and their membership to the American Immigration Lawyers Association and the state bar. 

Stay Skeptical 

While us citizenship and immigration services houston are an important resource for the road ahead, you will also need to use critical thinking and see through some of the unrealistic promises you may hear from certain attorneys. Not anyone can help you with the specific case and discovering this can spare you from wasting time. Stay wary of candidates that promise 100% success rates or suggest underhanded tactics to facilitate the process. A lawyer seeking clients directly near immigration offices is also a red flag, as this is considered unethical behavior. 

Weigh Your Options 

You may be unable to find the right lawyer immediately. Take the time and consult multiple attorneys for information and advice. This practice not only gives you a sample of each candidate, but also allows you to compare immigration information for consistency. 

Citizenship and other immigration matters require precision and expertise. Follow these tips to choose the attorney that will help you the most during this long, but worthwhile process.