Category Archives: Environment

Bioengineering

I’m glad to have stumbled upon this photo posted by DPWH Secretary Mark Villar in his Facebook page in July. The photo showed segment of Tarlac Pangasinan La Union Expressway (TPLEX). According to Sec. Villar, coco net and vertiber grass are being utilized in the 11-km segment of TPLEX to prevent soil erosion. The photo also carries hashtags #BuildBuildBuild and #Bioengineering.

DPWH Sec. Mark Villar photo

According to Wikipedia, bioengineering means the application of principles of biology and the tools of engineering to create usable, tangible, economically-viable products.

Sun-dried coconut halves

In 2012, I (with other bloggers) was able to observe how coco net are made — from drying coconut halves to decorticating the husks, twining the fibers, and finally weaving the net – during a tour at the green social enterprises in Las Piñas organized by the Villar Foundation. 

Decorticating machine separates coco fibers from coconut husk

Twining and weaving nets from coconut husks is just one of the social enterprises of the foundation. The other livelihood projects include handloom weaving, house waste composting, vermin composting, producing hollow blocks from trash, and crafting baskets from water hyacinths.

Worker separates fiber for twining

The development of these livelihood projects was an offshoot of an endeavor to clean and revive the Las Pinas-Zapote River.

The husks not thrown on the river were left on the sidewalks and the city had to spend more to haul the garbage. Trash collectors failed to collect sacks of coconut husk so they end up polluting the river.

Twining the coconut fibers to create ropes

To address the growing problem with coconut husks that were left on the sidewalks, Mrs. (now Senator) Cynthia Villar , managing director of the Villar Foundation, initiated and met with experts from Bicol University for the Coco Coir technology.

Twines are weaved in the loom to create nets

Dr. Justino Arboleda, an agricultural engineer, designed the machinery to make the coco-net. Coco Coir Enterprise utilizes coconut husk and convert them into coco net.

Finished coco nets are used for slope protection and control soil erosion. Coco nets are being used by Las Piñas City and private developers.

Congratulations, Sec. Villar for supporting #bioengineering techniques to complete government projects under the #BuildBuildBuild program. This sure saves a lot of government fundings.

Upgrades To Make Before Selling Your Home

When you decide to sell your home, if you are like most people, you want to get as much money from the sale as you can. To help you do that, here are four upgrades you should make that will attract the buyers and get you the most money for your investment.

Image by Paul Brennan from Pixabay

1. Lighting

A dreary house will be more difficult to sell than one that is filled with sunshine and emits a bright, welcoming appearance. So, clean your windows to let the light in and add light fixtures to dark corners of your home.

2. Paint

There is a myriad of colors available to paint the walls of your home with, but if you want to sell your home for the most money, make sure every room has a neutral color paint. The light-colored walls will allow the buyers to imagine their furniture in the settings, which will help your home sell.

3. Kitchen

According to real estate professionals, money spent on improving or updating kitchens and bathrooms is well spent. You can change the faucets, add quartz countertops Pittsburgh PA, or purchase new appliances. If your home is high-end, make sure to look at the floors to see if there is a wear pattern that needs replacing.

4. Yard

If you have a fence around your yard, make sure it is mended and looks sturdy. Also, remove any dead plants and replace them with flowers or new shrubs. Don’t forget to have the dead growth of your trees trimmed back and the grass neatly clipped.

Selling your home can be as exciting as you want it to be if you are prepared. Make the property appealing to new buyers, and your home can sell almost overnight. Just use the four upgrades listed above to help you get your home ready for buyers.

Preserving the Beauty of Wetlands

Taking care of the eco-system is an important role, especially when man-made changes impact local vegetation and wildlife. In the area of Florida, there are many littoral zones that need upkeep, since the zone is a requirement for many of the man-made lakes.

Photo by Dave on Unsplash

The Significance of Littoral Zones

Man-made lakes can impact a healthy ecosystem, but the right littoral zone can prevent erosion, improve water quality, and provide a safe habitat for local wildlife. For many of the areas in Florida, any lakes that are deeper than 6 feet and are greater than an acre in size require a zone. For a littoral zone, native plants cover approximately 80% of the vegetation. Another 10% of the area is covered with exotic plants. The diversity allows for native animal life to find a home, but the increased consumption of nitrogen and phosphorus by native life reduces the build of aquatic weeds and algae. Because of the growth that can occur and the displacement of wildlife, it is very important that the area is professionally maintained. You can establish a routine cleanout or upkeep with one of the littoral shelf maintenance Sarasota FL companies.

Zone Benefits

The aesthetic properties of a littoral zone are one of the prime benefits, especially when you are dealing with professional or residential areas. The natural beauty it offers can raise the value of the property, which is always a benefit for resale value. A zone can also be used to prevent erosion. The nutrients from the surrounding wetland make the roots of any plants on the shoreline stronger, making the bank more durable. This is another reason why proper maintenance is important. It helps stabilize the shoreline and improve water quality.

A littoral zone, though potentially required, is beneficial to both native wildlife and community residents. When it is well-maintained, it can be a beautiful but productive habitat.